When stories end

“Perhaps,” the girl said. “There is always a moment when stories end, a moment when everything is blue and black and silent, and the teller does not want to believe it’s over, and the listener does not, and so they both hold their breath and hope fervently as pilgrims that it is not over, that there are more tales to come … But no breath can be held forever, and all tales end. … Even mine.”

The Orphan’s Tale: In the Cities of Coin and Spice, by Catherynne M. Valente
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Revisiting The Break by Katherena Vermette

I wrote a review of The Break last year, but I wanted to share this review (start at about 11 minutes) from one of my favourite booktubers, MercysBookishMusings. Her review is more eloquent than mine was, but she touched on all the things that caught my attention and all the reasons that I loved the book.


Glow-in-the-dark Halloween cross stitch

Many years ago, I bought some glow-in-the-dark thread, but I didn’t like it because it was hard to stitch with (it was essentially thread wrapped in/with thin plastic) and it came in weird colours (think florescent colours, but in pastel). Then, I found DMC’s glow-in-the-dark thread and I knew that I had to find a pattern immediately because glow-in-the-dark is cool.

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Halloween was coming up, which seemed perfect for glow-in-the-dark thread, but I didn’t like any of the patterns I found, so I made my own. This was not an easy feat – I studied many patterns and even tried to play with free patterns (merging  2 or more, adjusting colours, etc.). In the end, I designed my own pattern in two parts – the pumpkin with glow-in-the-dark facial features and a glow-in-the-dark spider web for the background. It was early October 2011 and I figured I could whip it together by Halloween.

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By early November, I’d managed to get it half done. No problem – that just meant that it would be done by the following Halloween. Or, you know, Halloween 2018.

Seven years. It took me 7 years to finish the piece.

One of the benefits of all the decluttering and prioritizing I’ve been doing is that I’m no longer overwhelmed by all the unfinished projects I have, because I only kept a select few, including this pumpkin. I was quite proud of the design and I like Halloween. So, it was easy for me to pick this up and spend a week working on it.

Then, I took a trick that Alex from Florals and Floss recommended. She stains her hoops to make them look a bit more classy. I figured painting would work, too. So, I painted the outer hoop in black to match and blend in with the back ground. It looks really awesome.

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I also stitched some fabric to the back. This was not as easy as using felt, but I had fabric that worked with the piece. Side note: if you’re using directional fabric and don’t want to worry about lining it up properly, do it on an angle.

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Now my apartment is (sort of) decorated for Halloween because I thought it would be nice to pull out my other two Halloween pieces that I kept: a table runner made with Lizzie House Halloween fabric (newly christened as a wall hanging because I don’t use table runners) and Frankie (a.k.a. my boyfriend, a.k.a. yes, I’m well aware of the fact that he’s name is really Adam, but I prefer the name Frank). Now I get to enjoy them while embracing the autumn weather and lamenting the fact that the city is turning grey (the leaves never last long once they change colour).

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Next up, a few more stitching projects and I might also work on the Christmas quilt I started in 2015 (here’s a peak at a block that I finished). Maybe. Possibly. The website it was on no longer exists, so I’ll have to figure out how to finish it first.

Repurpose

Today, I avoided a day of shopping by repurposing something I was going to get rid of.

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My plan for this windy Saturday was to drag myself out the door to shop for a mat to put by my bed. Despite some pre-weekend Google searches, I wasn’t feeling very optimistic about finding something that would work and that I liked.

I like having a mat by my bed for two reasons: (1) it’s a little warmer on chilly winter mornings, and, (2) my floor gets dusty and dirty when my windows are open (most of the time, most of the year), and I like to have a mat to wipe my feet off before getting into bed. It’s like a doormat, but for my bed. A bed mat!

Over the summer, I was using a woven mat I bought at IKEA a couple years ago. It’s simple, durable, washable, and just about the right size for the space.  But, it belongs by my front door, where it’s supposed to keep most of the outdoor dirt away from my living space. Over the summer, I put up with wiping my shoes on the carpet in the hall and taking my shoes off as I was in the doorway. But, the weather has been wet and I needed to put my mat back by the door to catch the mud.

One of the things that the temporary mat taught me was that I definitely still need something that can be washed. Even though it wasn’t getting outdoor dirt when it was next to the bed, it still got dirty. When it’s by the front door, I typically wash the temporary mat every month or so, but because the mat was next to my bed, I often wanted to wash it more often. Unfortunately, the mat’s bulky and the dye is slowing washing out (i.e., it’s not something I can easily toss in with other things). I would like to wash my bed mat every time I wash my rags and such, so I wanted to find something washable and not too bulky. A couple small, woven area rugs (2 x 3 feet) would have worked.

Initially, I considered going to Ikea, but that’s a long way (1-1.5 hours and 1-2 transfers) for a couple of cheap rugs. Winners is hit and miss. And, most of the decor stores in my areas either didn’t seem to carry what I needed, or had expensive options. I envisioned a lot of “nope” and “where do I try next?”

Have I mentioned I don’t like to shop at the best of times? Needless to say, I was procrastinating to delay what I expected would be a long and annoying day. I convinced myself that I “had” to sort my donation/sell pile into categories. And, that’s where I found my solution.

A couple of years ago, in one of my many attempts to pick up regular yoga, I bought a yoga mat towel (these, but a different design). It was the peak of winter (read: cold!) and I thought that the mat towel would feel warmer. I had also been told that it would protect my mat. I happened to find a beautiful design in dark blue (my favourite colour), but I found it very annoying. Yes, it felt warmer, but it also got caught up in my feet, dragged around, bunched up under me and didn’t feel as grippy as I would have liked. At the end of the day, I much preferred to go without.

It ended up being one of those things that I had a really hard time getting rid of – it was beautiful, it had been expensive … surely I just needed to get used to it! So, there it was, still in my donate/sell pile. And, there was the empty space by my bed. The yoga mat towel has silicone on the bottom to grip to the floor, it’s soft, it feels warmer, it’s washable, it’s not bulky, it’s colourfast, it sort of matches my bedding, and I love it. Also, it’s free because I already own it, and it saved me from a day of shopping.

Sure, it’s not a conventional option for a mat and it doesn’t entirely match my bedding style, but who cares. Using it by my bed means that I get to repurpose something I love but wasn’t using, and it allows me to save the money I was going to spend (or, to spend it on something else, like the Himalayan rock salt lamp I’ve been wanting to buy).

I’ll still keep my eye open for something better (like this, but in pink; or one of the many fabulous rugs I’m pinned over the years), but this meets my needs and will get me through the winter.

Sometimes, you need to think outside the box.

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Deodorants

I used to use antiperspirants from the drug store. It was what I grew up with and the only option I knew about. But, I hated them. Forget all the cancer scare stuff, antiperspirants stink of manufactured perfumes, irritate my skin, and don’t seem to work all that well in the long run.

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When I first learned about other options, I tried a couple but, at the time, I couldn’t afford to keep trying until I found something that worked. So, I went back to regular antiperspirants.

Years later, when I started walking to work, I struggled with antiperspirants even more because I would get super sweaty from the walk and that sweat turned to stink. Even if I cleaned my armpits and reapplied antiperspirant when I got to work, I would still have days when my pits smelled bad. I was worried that I might have a serious odour problem and started researching what the cause could be. When I couldn’t find an obvious cause (my diet was already good, I showered daily, etc.), I started to consider the possibility that I would need to buy industrial strength antiperspirant.

But, one morning, I forgot to put on any antiperspirant and didn’t realize it until I was most of the way to work. I dreaded the consequences, but it ended up being a good mistake: when I got to work and cleaned my sweaty pits, I noticed that I didn’t smell quite as bad as usual. On a whim, I decided to see what would happen if I stopped putting on antiperspirant before I walked to work. It wasn’t ideal (I still had armpit odour), but it didn’t seem to be as bad as before. It occurred to me that the odour from my sweat was probably being trapped and retained by the antiperspirant. It is, after all, a pasty substance.

This led me to trying rock crystal deodorant, which was the only non-pasty option I knew of at the time. It wasn’t ideal and I had to reapply throughout the day, but I found that I had significantly fewer days when my armpits smelled like something had died in them and my skin wasn’t as irritated or dry. Still, there were some days when the stress or busyness of the day made me regret not using something stronger. I eventually decided to use antiperspirant as needed. This was a mistake because I was back to having problems with the odour lingering in my armpits. There always seemed to be some residue left over from the antiperspirant and I think that trapped the odour.

I was determined to find a better solution and in a position where I could afford to try lots of new options. I did my research, I tried natural and “natural” options, I scoured the drug stores, I spent hours reading product ingredients, I tried random homemade options, and I did countless Google searches. There are far more options now then there were even a couple years ago: Kaia (Canadian) and Native (American, but ships to Canada) are just two of the brands that are similar to standard stick deodorants or antiperspirants. There are countless other options that you can buy from indie online shops, etsy, and your local eco store. A lot of them don’t work for me.

After trying more options than I can remember, this is what I discovered:

  • Baking soda works, but I can’t use it long term (ex: daily) because it irritates my sensitive skin too much
  • Gooey or pasty products (pretty much every stick deodorant or antiperspirant) don’t work for me as they seem to stick to my skin and trap the odours from my sweat
  • I’m really resistant to most floral scents, but naturally derived scents are so much better than manufactured ones (I already knew this, but trying deodorants was a good reminder)
  • Natural doesn’t mean that they haven’t been a bit heavy handed with the perfumes
  • Spray deodorants don’t leave a goey residue and you don’t have to wait for them to dry
  • There are no perfect options and it’s OK to use more than one product to cover all your needs

What I found was that the rock crystal and some deodorant sprays work well enough for most of my needs: they’re fine for quiet days, they wash off my skin or out of clothes with water, they don’t leave a residue on me or my clothes, and I can easily add my second deodorant over top. I’m currently using Green Beaver’s Lavender Natural Deodorant Spray (Canadian) or Lafe’s Soothe Natural Deodorant Spray. Neither are plastic free, unfortunately, and the Green Beaver spray deodorant has something in it that bothers my nose and lungs. It has more additives than the Lafe’s deodorant, and I assume it’s one of those that bothers me. Nonetheless, I have it and I’m going to try and use it up – I just hold my breath when I spray it on.

On days when I need a little extra help (lots of meetings, lots of stress, etc.), I use Schmidt’s Lavender + Sage deodorant (I’ve also used Routine, which is a comparable Canadian brand). The Scmidt’s deodorant is a baking soda deodorant, so I can’t use it every day, but the formula isn’t goey, so it’s easy to wash off and doesn’t leave a residue. It also smells amazing. It can be annoying to apply because you have to use your fingers, but it comes in glass jar that can be re-used. It also comes with a little paddle to get it out of the jar, which is plastic, unfortunately.

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I had hoped that I would find the perfect solution, but perfection doesn’t exist. I’ll keep looking for zero waste options (for example, I could make my own baking soda deodorant), but I’m happy with what I have now because they’re better for my skin, more in tune with my priorities, and both products are from indie companies.

There are lots of other options out there, but some of them can feel pretty pricy compared to the cheap drug store brands. But, if natural products, zero waste or low impact living are priorities for you, it’s well worth the money if you can afford it.

I don’t own any bamboo cutlery, and that’s OK

All the Instagram and Pinterest pictures suggest to us that we need to have fancy bamboo cutlery or a custom made travel spork to be zero waste or low impact, but we don’t. Just use your regular cutlery.

This is what I use:

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You shouldn’t have to buy things to be zero waste!

I own “fancy” cutlery because I inherited some silver plate cutlery, which isn’t really fancy or worth anything. But, it is pretty. Tarnished because I’m too lazy to polish it, but pretty. I take whatever cutlery I need with me, straight from my cutlery drawer. This is usually just a spoon because I eat soup at work pretty much every day. I toss my cutlery in the bottom of my lunch bag. Some days, I may wrap them in a napkin or put them in a reusable snack bag, but I don’t own one of those custom cutlery wraps.

I don’t use chop sticks. Yeah, they’re cool and all, but I fail at using them with any degree of grace and feel no need master them.

I do have a couple stainless steel straws (a gift), but haven’t used them. I honestly can’t think of when I might use them. I never use straws and I’m not against drinking smoothies without a straw. I’m told that makes me weird, but I’m OK with that.

I also have one of these Cuppow drinking lids (found at a local eco store) that turns a wide mouth mason jars into a sippy mug style container. I use it when I make iced tea because I can safely make the drink in a mason jar (they can handle temperature changes from hot to cold) and it means that I can drink it without ice cubes freezing my upper lip. It’s a bit of a luxury item for me and you don’t need it to enjoy iced tea!

I own this spork-like thingie because, several months ago, I got sucked into the “buy to be zero waste” nonsense.  The spork goes with a napkin designed to wrap up into a tiny travel kit. It was an impulse purchase that I haven’t used yet, but I think it could be useful for travel because then I don’t have to worry about losing my day-to-day cutlery. Instead of a fancy spork, you could just pick up a few extra pieces of cutlery from a thrift store or a yard sale.

I used to own a bamboo cutlery set, but I quickly realized that they were redundant. I gave the bamboo to an acquaintance who wanted some lightweight cutlery for camping.

I own linen napkins because I grew up using them and I love how useful they are. I found these dark blue ones at 10,000 Villages a year or two ago and bought them because my old linen napkins were falling apart. Again, use what you have or make your own. [Side note: in this case, I will recommend looking for linen and not that polyester or mixed fibre nonsense you usually see in kitchen/decor stores. Linen softens over time and it’s more absorbent. You can often find linen napkins at thrift stores. But, regular cotton fabric is fine (though it doesn’t absorb much), flannel works, and even an old shirt cut and stitched into squares will work. I opt for dark colours because I’m too lazy to deal with stains.]

I don’t have a Swell brand water bottle or whatever is on trend these days. Heck, I still use a plastic water bottle. At home, I have some re-purposed juice bottles (glass) that I use for water. But, plastic water bottles are super convenient for travelling or hiking. Plus, I already owned it.

I also have two insulated hot beverage mugs. I keep one at work to use as my water glass and tea mug. The second one is typically only use for hikes, travelling or days when I want to keep some hot tea insulated at home.

I also have a bunch of stainless steel food containers. I mostly use glass jars (mason jars, washed out condiment jars, etc.), but I decided that it would be nice to have a few light weight containers for lunches. I bought these because I needed to replace some old plastic lunch containers, not because Instagram told me they were cool. Though, they are pretty awesome because I saved up for some leak proof containers from Life Without Plastic.

I still have plastic containers, too. I will use these until they are no longer usable, then I’ll save up for some light weight metal containers because the idea of taking glass to the market makes me nervous.

The point of all this is to show that you don’t have to buy stuff to be zero waste or low-impact. You can buy things, but unless you’re replacing something that you need and use, it’s better to go without. It’s also better to keep using what you already have, even if it’s plastic, to get the full life out of the items before sending them to the landfill (bonus points if you can find a secondary use for the items, like using old plastic containers to separate things in drawers). When they need to be replaced, either buy second hand (even if it’s plastic) or look for eco-friendly options.

I made the mistake of buying a few things that I didn’t need, but now I’m more thoughtful about what I buy and more creative about finding alternatives, like washed out jars. When I go grocery shopping, I often think about packaging and how I can re-use it later. For me, buying a slightly more expensive bottle of mustard is worth it if it comes in a glass jar that I can easily re-use. The only issue I’ve had is with some spicy or strong flavoured things, like tomato sauce, which permeate into the lids. But, I try to use those bottles either for similar types of food (ex: left over pasta) or non-food items (ex: to hold rubber bands).

Book review – The Art of Frugal Hedonism, by Annie Raser-Rowland & Adam Grubb

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When I found out about The Art of Frugal Hedonism, I was intrigued because that sounds contradictory – hedonism, the pursuit of pleasure, is something typically associated with having lots of money to spend on all the greatest pleasures in life: the best food, the most exclusive wine, the softest fabric, the rarest gems, etc. But, the authors argue that there’s a sweet spot between penny-pinching and over consumption. They also maintain that it’s entirely reasonable and appropriate to ignore the typical 40+ hours a week rat race and focus on earning just enough, instead. Combining those two thoughts (having just enough money and working only as much as you need) with a healthy dose of frugal living is something they strive for. In other words, they have a roof over their heads and can feed themselves, but they don’t over indulge and they bargain for goods and services where they can.

One of the great things about this book is that they don’t tell you to drop everything and start being frugal this instant. Instead, they explore different options and explain how these options might work for you or have worked for people they know. Each chapter touches on another aspect or another option, so you get a pretty broad look at all the possible ways you can be frugal and find great, but cheap, pleasures in life, like potlucks with friends or long walks in nature.

Overall, I think that they had a lot of good ideas and great intentions. My one complaint is that I felt that they were very insular in their thought processes. While I don’t expect a book to represent all possible options, I was frustrated by a few things. For example, I felt as though they implied that frugal living was easy to start and to maintain, when in fact it may require a big shift in habits and may even require developing skills that some people would find very uncomfortable. As an introvert, I can assure you that bargaining and community building is not as easy as “just asking” – it requires at least a little bit of courage.

Another thing that I took issue with was a bit of fat shaming. I know that I can be a bit over sensitive to this because of my bad relationship with my body, but I was hurt when these seemingly nice people who seemed to embrace people for who they were and not their physical traits suddenly described seeing gym goers by saying “…the desperate pumping of blobby limbs spied through the gym window.” Based on the context, I believe it was meant as a witty remark, but the implication was negative and it nearly put me right off the book. But, I reminded myself that I can be overly sensitive and kept reading. Sadly, I was disappointed again when they made light of mental illness, implying that it was something that frugal hedonism could cure: “…have you heard about the therapy bills those ‘enviable’ types with designer lounge suites and private pilates instructors are racking p? Choose patchy purchasing for mental and fiscal health today!!

I nearly quit again, but I resolved to finish reading it because I always try to read as much as I can when I intend to do a review. Thankfully, I didn’t find any more overtly offensive remarks. At the end of the day, I think that they were, as mentioned above, just trying to be witty. But, they were ignorant to the possibility that fat people or people who need therapy might be reading the book. While I’m disappointed by this, I don’t think that the remarks were intentionally hurtful and I believe that the book has a lot of good information in it that could help people who want to try to be a bit more frugal. Personally, I won’t be quitting my job to live the life of a frugal hedonist any time soon, but I have taken some of their ideas into consideration and I’ve referred to many of the resources they provided at the end of the book (books, online resources, etc.).

I think that this book could be very useful and interesting to a lot of people, especially people who are looking for cheap ways to have fun, new ideas for living frugally, or options that they could incorporate into their lives as they embark on long term travelling or living in a van (van living seems to be very trendy these days).

So, yes, I was a bit offended by a few things they said, but, overall, I think this is a good resource and I’m glad that I read it.

Sketchbooks and such

Despite several years of not being able to find the right thing, I keep clinging to the idea that there’s a perfect book out there that works as a sketch book, a wet media book, and a journal. But, everything I try misses the mark. The paper is always too thin or too rough, too starkly white or two creamy yellow, and too flimsy to handle wet media or so thick that I only get a couple dozen pages in one sketchbook. Then there’s the binding, which is always too tight to open flatly or poorly done. And, don’t even get me started on how much I hate cheesy cover designs or having to pick from half a dozen colours I don’t like that much.

They never seen to quite meet my needs. But, today, I’m going on record to admit that the perfect book doesn’t exist and that it’s OK to have more then one book for all of my needs: one to write in, one to sketch in, and one to paint in, when the mood strikes me.

Honestly, I should have just accepted this last year when I had to make the difficult decision to toss an old sketchbook that made me upset every time I looked at it. The sketches were worth saving and the only reason I’d kept the book. But, I’d also used it for journaling during a very frustrating few months. It was full of bitching, whining, and turmoil that I needed to out of my life. So, I scanned the sketches and tossed the book, vowing to never mix bitching with sketching again. [Side note: I also took a long, hard look at how I journaled and realized that I was mostly just using it as an excuse to whine and perpetuate my frustrations, which just made me unhappy. I journal differently now. For example, if I need to bitch, it goes in a digital document that I then delete.]

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Some of the scanned images from my doomed sketch/journal book.

Now I have a multi-book system. For writing, I prefer something with lines. I use this mostly for brain storming ideas, writing about things that I’m still trying to work out, writing about new ideas that have inspired me, or taking notes from books. These days, it’s mostly notes from books and things that have inspired me because I’ve been reading a lot of non-fiction and I like to make notes or copy quotes from the books. This allows me to process what I read, but it also helps me to let go of the book when I’ve finished reading it. In some cases, it also helps me to avoid buying a book – I used to be in the habit of borrowing books and buying a copy as soon as I thought I needed to underline something. I can’t tell you how many times I ended up wasting money just to underline a few lines!

My preferred book for writing is a lined A5 (5.8 x 8.3 inch) Leuchtturm1917, but I’ll use anything that’s A5. I currently have two on the go: a gridded Leuchtturm1917 for most things and an un-lined Ciak for art related notes. I use the Ciak for art notes because the slightly thicker paper means that I can draw or paint samples to illustrate the notes.

For watercolour, I have a couple of options, including a Stillman & Birn multimedia book, Carolyn Gavin multimedia sketchbooks, Moleskin watercolour books, and a Global Art book. We can discuss the fact that I have a stupid number of extra sketchbooks another time! I’m going to use my Moleskin for now because Fog and Swell recommended the brand the last time I whined about not being able to use watercolour in whatever book I was using at the time. The thick paper handles wet media quite well and the smooth surface will be good for my fountain pens.

And, then there’s the daily sketchbook. Usually, I’ll use just about anything that agrees with my fountain pens (good quality, smooth paper), like most of the extra multimedia books I mentioned above. But, sometimes I like to buy something pretty and special, even if it doesn’t handle fountain pen ink that well. That’s when I head over to Sprout Press Handbound Books. Her books are beautiful, but I’m not a big fan of her paper choice as it’s a bit thin for fountain pen ink or wet media. If I’m writing, I’m OK with the bleed through of the ink. But, it’s harder with sketching because I get annoyed and distracted by the bled through. One of these days I’ll plan ahead enough to ask for a custom book with different paper, but right now I really wanted something beautiful that would make me want to pick up my sketchbook each day. Life has been frustrating, and I knew I needed to get back in the habit of doing daily sketching, so I opted for beauty over function to give me something to be excited about each day. And, the book I picked is freaking beautiful. The cover is hand-dyed paper in one of my favourite colour combos – white and blue. Carolyn used blue paper and fancy binding to make the spin look stunning. And, there are a few pieces of brown paper in the book, which brings me great joy because I love white ink or coloured pencil on brown paper.

This is definitely a luxury item – it was not cheap, but even with the thin paper, I think it’s well worth every penny I spent. I’ve only had it three days, and I’ve already fondled, oogled, and been delighted by it a dozen times. And, I have a standard ball point pen that works just fine for sketching on the thin paper.

This is definitely a situation where my attempts to minimize and simplify back-fired. I need multiple books and I’m much happier being able to separate my journaling and sketching. When I’m using a sketchbook that handles wet media, I won’t need a separate wet media sketchbook, but I’m OK with needing a third book. Heck, maybe it will help me to experiment a little more with my watercolours.

Plastic Free July – end of month check-in

Plastic Free July went as expected: not bad, but I still need to work on changing some habits.

After some adjustments to accommodate my lack of interest in taking the garbage out and the summer heat, I think that I’ve settled on a garbage bag free scheme that I can live with (see below). I just need to get better about taking the garbage out as needed instead of waiting for the garbage can to be full. I never let it get bad enough to have a smelly apartment (I live in a small space, so I refuse to live with bad smells), but there were times when I pushed the limits and ross things grew in my garbage can.

But, here’s what seems to be working:

As I mentioned in my kick-off post, my bathroom garbage doesn’t accumulate smelly or gross things. Mostly, it’s just a place to dump my dental floss and all the dust and such that I sweep up. It gets dirty from the dust, but it’s not decaying or rotting, so it’s fine and doesn’t require a garbage bag.

In my kitchen, I did have some problems with rot, decay and food sticking to the bottom of the can (which meant having to soak and wash the can before using it again). Because of this, and because it’s summer, I decided to default to freezing everything food related. It’s still been a bit annoying, I miss garbage bags, and I miss being able to just toss something in the trash instead of having to open the freezer, taking a container out, etc. But, it works.

I did try a few other options over the month:

  • I tried to convince myself to empty the garbage every couple of days (2-3), but that will require a fairly big habit shift or maybe storing my garbage bin by the door (not ideal – I prefer not having to look at it and I live in a small space). Again, I know it seems silly, but it’s not like I’m just walking to the end of the garden (I’m several floors up and have to open a dumpster, which can smell really bad in the summer).
  • I tried lining my bin with flyers to keep food from sticking to the bottom. It was certainly better, but not by much and I would still have to empty the garbage more often. Also, that still requires extra resources (flyers).
  • I considered using plastic bags I had on hand (from things like frozen foods that I could only get in plastic), but I worried that this was just one very tiny step towards spiralling back into either buying garbage bags or using it as an excuse to allow myself to buy more things in plastic. Not to say that I’m completely plastic free (I still buy frozen peas), but I’m trying to avoid plastic.

This is definitely something that I still need to work on to find a solution that works best for me, but I have some large yogurt containers that I could use for perishables. I’m considering keeping one on my counter until it’s full and allowing myself to accumulate a couple containers in the freezer before taking the garbage out. I’ll still use the garbage can for non-perishables and plastics.

Speaking of plastic, I’ve been tracking my plastic consumption these past few weeks to see where I can make improvements. It’s been an interesting project and I’m pleased to say that my plastic consumption has reduced in the past few months.I still have room to improve, but I’m happy with the progress.

Here are a few examples of the kinds of things I had:

  • Labels from jars that I wanted to save. A couple of thelabels were made of plastic. Needless to say, I’ll try to remember to always look for non-plastic containers with non-plastic labels.
  • The mesh and label from a package of garlic because I could not find it un-packaged that day, despite trying more than one store. Usually, I’m well stocked with garlic, so this is rarely a problem.
  • A chip bag (or two). I like chips on occasion, but I know I can find good enough options (like bulk pretzels or popcorn bought in bulk, made on the stovetop, and flavoured with herbs or with bulk flavouring that you can get at the Bulk Barn). This was a case of letting a bad day supercede my good intentions.
  • The packaging from frozen peas. I’m just not ready to give them up yet and bulk peas from the market are expensive, if you can find them. I do try to buy the largest bag possible (even if it means separating them out into a couple of containers in the freezer to keep them from getting too freezer burnt).
  • Odds and ends of things that were small but represented other areas I need to work on. For example, plastic from a package. I could have bought that book with less waste overall if I’d gone to the store when the book was published instead of pre-ordering it online.
  • A wrapper from a chocolate bar. It was fair trade chocolate (yay), but it still came in plastic (boo). I could stop eating chocolate (as if) or I could just get off my lazy butt and go to the grocery store that has really great bulk.

Despite not being plastic free yet, I think that the Plastic Free July challenge was incredibly helpful and a useful challenge. It allowed me to recommit to the idea of living a low-waste life and allowed me to finally give up something I’d been really resistant to giving up (who knew garbage bags were so important to me).

So, Plastic Free July was a success for me and I’m taking some new ideas and habits into August. My intention is to continue to be low-waste and work towards being as close to zero waste was I can.

Did you try giving up any plastic for July?